How to Save a Whale (video)

We are very excited to launch our “How to Save a Whale” resource made possible through the Sitka Foundation. Please see below for the video and share widely.

With the fortunate increase in the number of Humpback Whales off our coast, it is essential that boaters know more about the risks of collision and entanglement (for the sake of whale AND boater safety).

Our preliminary results conducted in collaboration with DFO show that over 47% of Humpbacks in British Columbia have scarring that shows they have been entangled (>1,000 Humpbacks). This data provides an indication of how very serious the risk of entanglement is. It does not reveal how many Humpbacks have died as a result of entanglement.


For key points on how to avoid collision, please see www.SeeABlowGoSlow.org 


Summary of key points on what to do in case you find an entangled whale:

  1. With great urgency, report the entanglement with location. In British Columbia call the DFO Incident Line at  1-800-465-4336. If you do not have cell service, use VHF Channel 16 (Coast Guard).
  2. If at all possible, remain with the whale at a distance until trained help arrives or another boat takes over tracking, otherwise the chances of relocating the whale are greatly diminished
  3. Take whatever video/photos are possible but maintain a distance that doesn’t stress the whale.

Why it is so important NOT to attempt to remove any fishing gear or rope from the whale:

  1. It risks human and whale safety (has led to human death). Professional training and equipment are needed to assess the entanglement and proceed safely with the greatest chance of success.
  2.  Often, much of the fishing gear in which the whale is entangled is not visible at the surface. If members of the public put themselves at risk and remove gear at the surface, they would not help the whale because now it is more difficult to:
  • Recognize that the whale is entangled; and
  • Disentangle the whale even if it is relocated.Trailing gear at the surface provides the opportunity for trained responders to attach a tag to track the whale and/or to attach floatation to maintain contact with and slow down an entangled whale. Loss of this gear can significantly reduce rescuers’ ability to save the whale.

 

About MERS

We are a non-profit organization dedication to promoting conservation and understanding of marine ecosystems through scientific research and environmental education.
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2 Responses to How to Save a Whale (video)

  1. Jennifer Lavoie says:

    Great video. Now i know the first responder steps. I would only add the following minor editorial note: – spell-out and name the DFO acronym. Some people don’t know what that means.

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